Team Sick! Racing

Javi Espinosa

9

Jake 100 (Reserve)

100

Nancy van de Ven

85

Alexis Letellier

27
Rank
9
Points
40
Base City
Graz
Team Captain
Dave Coleman
First Entry
2022
Owned by Austrian mountain biker, YouTube sensation and entrepreneur Fabio Wibmer, SICK! Series Racing are the eSC team with a creative edge. Sick! Racing team is the latest venture from mountain biker, YouTube star and serial entrepreneur Fabio Wibmer. Having built a YouTube channel with over 7 million subscribers and more than a billion views, Fabio branched into sports and fashion wear with his SICK! clothing brand. Racing fan Fabio believes that with its combination of high energy competition and creative content, eSC can capture the imaginations of a large audience. “I’m passionate about creating engaging and compelling content that offers viewers something different and pushes boundaries. The racing is completely new and I’m excited to see the series evolve over the coming seasons.”

Javi Espinosa

Rider
Key player in Madrid’s street scooter riding scene, setting up Street Jump events around the city. Javi Espinosa has just spent a year working in the only scooter shop in Madrid. As both a salesman and mechanic, Javi’s work at ScooterXtreme has recently come to an end so he can concentrate on his final year of exams and prepare for eSC. Javi has been studying sports at the European University on the outskirts of the Spanish capital while building a career in the world of freestyle scooters. The 21 year old says his ambition is to create a scooter academy to foster a scene in the city to rival the scene in Barcelona. In fact, Javi and his five younger sisters were born and raised in Barcelona before his father’s work took them to Madrid when Javi was 14. Two years earlier, he discovered scooters, having been given one as a surprise present. Since then he has been at the forefront of the Madrid street scene, helping to set up Street Jump events where competitors have the opportunity to win scooter parts and accessories. “The main difference between street scooter and park scooter is that we don’t ride to be the best,” he says. “We ride for the love of it and to share the sport with others.” Inspired by Dakota Schuetz’s exploits on YouTube, Javi’s highlight of his career so far was getting the call up to do eSC to race against his hero.‍
Key player in Madrid’s street scooter riding scene, setting up Street Jump events around the city. Javi Espinosa has just spent a year working in the only scooter shop in Madrid. As both a salesman and mechanic, Javi’s work at ScooterXtreme has recently come to an end so he can concentrate on his final year of exams and prepare for eSC. Javi has been studying sports at the European University on the outskirts of the Spanish capital while building a career in the world of freestyle scooters. The 21 year old says his ambition is to create a scooter academy to foster a scene in the city to rival the scene in Barcelona. In fact, Javi and his five younger sisters were born and raised in Barcelona before his father’s work took them to Madrid when Javi was 14. Two years earlier, he discovered scooters, having been given one as a surprise present. Since then he has been at the forefront of the Madrid street scene, helping to set up Street Jump events where competitors have the opportunity to win scooter parts and accessories. “The main difference between street scooter and park scooter is that we don’t ride to be the best,” he says. “We ride for the love of it and to share the sport with others.” Inspired by Dakota Schuetz’s exploits on YouTube, Javi’s highlight of his career so far was getting the call up to do eSC to race against his hero.‍

Jake 100 (Reserve)

racer
Known to his millions of followers on YouTube, Instagram and TikTok as Jake 100, freestyle bike rider makes his debut in the eSC in London as a reserve rider.
Known to his millions of followers on YouTube, Instagram and TikTok as Jake 100, freestyle bike rider makes his debut in the eSC in London as a reserve rider.

Nancy van de Ven

Rider
One of the best riders in the Women’s Motocross World Championship, Nancy grew up riding MX along with her brother Rinus and started competing at age 11, winning the Dutch 85 Championship as an amateur. In 2013, she stepped up to the 125 WMX championship, establishing herself as one of the leading riders and finishing runner-up five times. She's also one of the few professional MX riders with her own business selling false eyelashes.
One of the best riders in the Women’s Motocross World Championship, Nancy grew up riding MX along with her brother Rinus and started competing at age 11, winning the Dutch 85 Championship as an amateur. In 2013, she stepped up to the 125 WMX championship, establishing herself as one of the leading riders and finishing runner-up five times. She's also one of the few professional MX riders with her own business selling false eyelashes.

Alexis Letellier

Rider
Winner of the 2016 Montreux Scooter Championship. As a boy, Alexis Letellier was a keen footballer and one day asked his mother whether she could cut his hair like his hero. These days, he admits that looking like bald-headed France captain Zinedine Zidane might not have been his best move. Alexis put his dreams of becoming a top-flight footballer on hold when he got his first scooter aged 13. He started to ride with friends on the Parisian skate parks and quickly started to develop a passion for freestyle scooter riding. His new goal was to enter events such as the Montreux Scooter Contest in Switzerland. And in 2016, he finally realised his dream - and went on to win it. “The key thing about scooter riding is that you need to practice and I’m not talking about hours and hours, but years and years,” says Alexis. “Tricks and crazy stunts just takes time.” But the more ambitious the tricks, the more likely you are to suffer injury and Alexis has taken his fair share of knocks. “I broke my ACL, some ribs, my fibula and also damaged cartilage in the knee too,” he says. “I’ve spent a lot of time in rehab from crashing on my scooter. But I’m not worried about it, I just want to ride all the time. It’s what I love.” Three years ago, he moved to Barcelona to enjoy its sunshine and thriving scooter scene and until recently he shared an apartment there with fellow eSC rider Matis Neyroud.
Winner of the 2016 Montreux Scooter Championship. As a boy, Alexis Letellier was a keen footballer and one day asked his mother whether she could cut his hair like his hero. These days, he admits that looking like bald-headed France captain Zinedine Zidane might not have been his best move. Alexis put his dreams of becoming a top-flight footballer on hold when he got his first scooter aged 13. He started to ride with friends on the Parisian skate parks and quickly started to develop a passion for freestyle scooter riding. His new goal was to enter events such as the Montreux Scooter Contest in Switzerland. And in 2016, he finally realised his dream - and went on to win it. “The key thing about scooter riding is that you need to practice and I’m not talking about hours and hours, but years and years,” says Alexis. “Tricks and crazy stunts just takes time.” But the more ambitious the tricks, the more likely you are to suffer injury and Alexis has taken his fair share of knocks. “I broke my ACL, some ribs, my fibula and also damaged cartilage in the knee too,” he says. “I’ve spent a lot of time in rehab from crashing on my scooter. But I’m not worried about it, I just want to ride all the time. It’s what I love.” Three years ago, he moved to Barcelona to enjoy its sunshine and thriving scooter scene and until recently he shared an apartment there with fellow eSC rider Matis Neyroud.
Rider Stats
Season Average
All
Esp
100
van
Let
SEASON OVERVIEW
City Standings
EVENTS PARTICIPATED
11
RACES WON
0
All
Esp
100
van
Let
PHOTO GALLERY